Drafts of the Forest Plan

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The following drafts of the Forest Plan were developed in response to public comments and internal reviews

Draft 5

Reader's Guide for Draft Forest Plan and Draft Environmental Impact Statement (911 KB PDF) Includes: Review tips; Tips on effective commenting; Where to submit your comments; Next steps; and Contacts for more information

Questions and Answers (123 KB PDF)

  • Complete Draft 5 in one document (Includes all files below): August 2012 - (3,137 KB PDF)
  • Cover and Table of Contents: August 2012 - (102 KB PDF)
  • Chapter 1. Introduction: August 2012 - (584 KB PDF)
  • Chapter 2. Forestwide Desired Conditions: August 2012 - (462 KB PDF)
  • Chapter 3. Objectives: August 2012 - (265 KB PDF)
  • Chapter 4: Standards and Guidelines: August 2012 - (513 KB PDF)
  • Chapter 5: Management Area Direction: August 2012 - (599 KB PDF)
  • Chapter 6: Monitoring and Evaluation: August 2012 - (246 KB PDF)
  • Chapter 7: Suitability: August 2012 - (355 KB PDF)
  • Chapter 8: Additional Plan Direction: August 2012 - (148 KB PDF)
  • List of Preparers, Glossary, and References: August 2012 - (313 KB PDF)
  • Appendix A. Maps: August 2012 - (1,339 KB PDF)
  • Appendix B. Proposed and Probable Management Practices: August 2012 - (134 KB PDF)
  • Appendix C. Community Landscape Vision Statements: August 2012 - (167 KB PDF)
  • Appendix D. Index of Other Supporting Plan Documentation: August 2012 - (36 KB PDF)
  • Annotated Draft 5: August 2012 - (4,529 KB PDF)

Draft 4

  • All chapters (not including Maps and Appendices which are available below) - (1,349 KB PDF)
  • Chapter 1. Introduction: February 4, 2011 - (190 KB PDF)
  • Chapter 2. Desired Conditions: February 4, 2011 - (505 KB PDF)
  • Chapter 3. Objectives: February 4, 2011 - (221 KB PDF)
  • Chapter 4. Standards or Guidelines: February 4, 2011 - (268 KB PDF)
  • Chapter 5. Management Area Direction: February 4, 2011 - (194 KB PDF)
  • Chapter 6. Monitoring and Evaluation: February 4, 2011 - (188 KB PDF)
  • Annotated Draft 4: February 4, 2011 - (1,563 KB PDF)

Draft 3

  • Chapter 1. Introduction: June 30, 2010 - (390 KB PDF)
  • Chapter 2. Desired Conditions: July 1, 2010 - (331 KB PDF)
  • Chapter 3. Objectives: June 29, 2010 - (269 KB PDF)
  • Chapter 4. Standards or Guidelines: July 1, 2010 - (286 KB PDF)
  • Chapter 5. Management Area Direction: June 30, 2010 - (229 KB PDF)
  • Chapter 6. Monitoring and Evaluation: July 2, 2010 - (161 KB PDF)

Draft 2

  • Chapter 2. Desired Conditions: June 8, 2010 - (288 KB PDF)
  • Chapter 3. Objectives: June 11, 2010 - (236 KB PDF)
  • Chapter 4. Standards and Guidelines: May 4, 2010 - (203 KB PDF)

Draft 1

  • Chapter 2. Desired Conditions: May 4, 2010 - (242 KB PDF)
  • Chapter 4. Standards and Guidelines: May 4, 2010 - (203 KB PDF)

Maps

The following maps were developed in conjunction with the various drafts of the Forest plan.

Map A. Draft Scenic Integrity Objective Zones

  • Version released for Draft 1 - (1,169 KB PDF
  • Notes: Scenic objectives of Very High (VH) or High (H) would receive special treatment to avoid impacting the viewshed.

Map A1. DETAILED Draft Scenic Integrity Objective Zones

  • Version release for Draft 3 - (3,975 KB PDF)
  • Notes: This map became available in September 2010 and was developed in response to public comments.  The Scenic Integrity Objectives are the same as the above Map A, but the colors have changed. The Forest Visitor Map was used as a background to show more information for the viewer to orient themselves. In order to provide detail, this file is large andw ill take time to open
  • More information on the Scenic Management Process and how these zones were created: Scenery Management System Inventory Repor (648 KB PDF); Landscape Character Description (1,050 KB PDF)

Map B. Strategic Fire Management Objectives

  • Version released for Draft 3 - (411 KB PDF)
  • Version released for Draft 1 - (215 KB PDF)
  • Notes: Areas indicated in the legend as having protection and resource benefit fire management objectives would have the possibility of having “managed wildfire.” For example, a lightning-caused wildland fire could be managed to expand to provide ecological benefit, under certain circumstances. The boundaries of areas were adjusted to allow more flexibility in fire management in the eastern half of the Prescott National Forest where Forest Service land ownership is more consolidated.

Map C. Draft Existing Recreation Opportunity Spectrum Zones

  • Version released for Draft 1 - (1,294 KB PDF)
  • Notes: The Recreation Opportunity Spectrum (ROS) classifies recreation experiences from Urban to Primitive. The classification includes criteria such as distance from roads, likelihood of seeing other people, or presence of facilities. The primitive (P) or Semi-primitive Non-Motorized (SPNM) classification is often associated with designated Wilderness. The Rural (R) classification could be found within a developed campground; Semi-Primitive Motorized (SPM) might include an area with few low speed roads.

Map C1. DETAILED Draft Existing Recreation Opportunity Spectrum Zones.

  • Version released for Draft 3 - (3,782 KB PDF)
  • Notes: This version became available Spetember 2010 and was developed in response to public comments. The Recreation Opportunity Spectrum Zones classifications are the same as are shown on the above Map C, but the Forest Visitor Map was used as a background to show more information for the viewer to orient themselves. Categories have been combined to make the map less confusing. Based on the proximity of lands to existing roads, the Prescott has only 3 classifications of Recreation Opportunity Spectrum Zones. In the final classification, all parcels must be at least 2,500 acres so some shown on the map may disappear during further analysis. In order to provide detail, this file is large and will take time to open

Map D. Draft Potential Natural Vegetation Types

  • Version released for Draft 2 - (1,185 KB PDF)
  • Notes: Potential Natural Vegetation Types (PNVTs) are coarse-scale units of non-contiguous land that share similar climate components, soil types, vegetation, and natural disturbances. PNVTs were identified based on information from the Terrestrial Ecosystem Survey of the Prescott National Forest (Robertson and others 2000). Descriptions of desired vegetation for each PNVT can be found in Chapter 2, Desired Conditions. Objectives include proposed activities and projects within each PNVT that are intended to help trend toward Desired Conditions.

Map E. Management Areas

  • Version released for Draft 3 - (737 KB PDF)
  • Notes: This map displays management area boundaries as well as slightly modified boundaries of Recreation Opportunity Zones that we renamed Geographic Areas.

Map F. Open Spaces Areas - Verde Valley

  • Version released for Draft 3 - (1,761 KB PDF)
  • Notes: This map is referenced in the Verde Valley Management Area guideline MA-VV-5. It shows areas where lands should be retained in National Forest ownership.

Map G. Granite Mountain Wilderness Desired Experiences

  • Version released for Draft 3 - (444 KB PDF)
  • Notes: This map accompanies the Williamson South Management Area desired condition and displays areas with varying desired recreation experiences.

Additional Information

  • Revised Forest Plan Alternatives Comparison Chart: September 1, 2011 (311 KB PDF)
  • Annotated Draft 4: February 11, 2011 (1,563 KB PDF)

Chapter Descriptions

The following paragraphs describe the general contents of each chapter in the Draft Forest Plan.

Chapter 1 Introduction

  • The Introduction includes information on the needs for change, decisions made in a Forest Plan, Plan Organization, Management Approaches, and explanation of concepts to improve plan clarity. Management Approaches are not formal plan components but are predictions of methods that might be used to carry out objectives. Concept Descriptions were developed largely in response to feedback received from those who reviewed earlier plan drafts.

Chapter 2 Forest-wide Desired Conditions

  • This is the focus of the revised plan. It includes descriptions of conditions or outcomes that we will work toward during future years. You’ll notice that the desired conditions are descriptions of desired outcomes, not methods of reaching the desired outcomes. Desired conditions are integrated among many resources on the Prescott National Forest. For instance you may find social or economic desired conditions next to descriptions of vegetation because the social/economic conditions interact with vegetation desires.

Chapter 3 Objectives

  • The objectives are projects and activities that are expected to be used to trend toward desired conditions over a specified time period. They are numeric, time-limited, feasible, and achievable.

Chapter 4 Standards or Guidelines that Apply to all of the Prescott National Forest

  • Standards and guidelines provide the side-boards and additional guidance for projects and activities in order to trend toward the desired conditions. They do not restate existing law or policy—you may notice few related to Heritage Resources, because the majority of guidance already exists in law or policy direction. They also do not include statements that recommend an analysis, inventory, or monitoring. The monitoring strategy should cover the need for those items.

Chapter 5 Management Area Direction

  • Management Area Direction provides guidance for recreation management that is specific to certain geographic areas. Open space concerns are addressed in the Verde Valley through a management area guideline. Originally we thought we would have only 3 management areas that coincided with the Recreation Strategy zones. Instead we sub-divided the zones to improve description of management area desired conditions.

Chapter 6 Monitoring and Evaluation

  • The monitoring strategy is intended to identify questions that can and should be answered with monitoring data, in order to determine our progress toward desired conditions.