Welcome to the Intermountain Region


Photo of a lake surrounded by pines with a rocky shale mountain in the background. Photo of an area in the Cottonwood Wilderness on the Dixie National Forest Photo of an area in the Dark Canyon Wilderness on the Manti-La Sal National Forest Photo of an area in the Mount Timpanogos Wilderness on the Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest taken taken by Bruce Tremper. Photo of a mountain in the Sawtooth Wilderness on the Sawtooth National Forest


 

BLM, USFS Plans for Western Public Lands Provide for Greater Sage-Grouse Protection, Balanced Development

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) released final environmental reviews for proposed land use plans that will help conserve greater sage-grouse habitat and support sustainable economic development on portions of public lands in 10 states across the West. The land management plans, developed during the past three years in partnership with the states and with input from local partners, will benefit wildlife, outdoor recreation, ranching and other traditional land uses that rely on a healthy sagebrush landscape.

Colorado - BLM, USFS Plans for Public Lands in Colorado Provide for Greater Sage-Grouse Protection, Balanced Development

Idaho/SW Montana - BLM, USFS Plans for Public Lands in Idaho and Southwest Montana Provide for Greater Sage-Grouse Protection, Balanced Development

Nevada - BLM, USFS Plans for Public Lands in Nevada and Northeastern California Provide for Greater Sage-Grouse Protection, Balanced Development

Oregon - BLM Plans for Public Lands in Oregon Provide for Greater Sage-Grouse Protection, Balanced Development

Utah - BLM, USFS Plans for Public Lands in Utah Provide for Greater Sage-Grouse Protection, Balanced Development

Wyoming- BLM, USFS Plans for Public Lands in Wyoming Provide for Greater Sage-Grouse Protection, Balanced Development

Additional information about ongoing land use plan revisions can be found on the Bureau of Land Management Sage-Grouse and Sagebrush Conservation web site. You can click on the links below to access state-specific information: 

Recent News


Features

Nature High Summer Camp

The Forest Service is currently recruiting for participants for the 24th annual Nature High Summer Camp on July 27-August 1, 2015. This is an amazing interagency program that gets Utah high school students into the woods to try their hand at Natural Resource careers. They spend a week in the beautiful Manti-La Sal National Forest learning about natural resource agencies, and service to the land. The cost is only $50 to attend (which includes housing, food and supplies for the entire week). To see more about what the camp entails, watch this fun promotional video.


Careers

The Forest Service employs more than 30,000 permanent employees in hundreds of locations across the country. Forest Service employees focus their skills to manage and improve our nation's forest lands in many ways. Many work in forest and range research, some develop the skills of others at our Job Corps Centers and others provide expertise in State and Private Forestry partnerships across the country. If you are as dedicated to advancing our mission as we are, you should seek job opportunites where your skills are competitive.

Spotlights

Climate Change

Global climate change is altering forest and grassland ecosystems. These lands produce services such as water, clean air, wood products, recreation, wildlife habitats, etc.

Fishlake National Forest Pando Clone

The Pando Clone is an aspen stand encompassing approximately 106 acres on the Fishlake National Forest. This clone (based on DNA testing) is thought to be the largest organism in the world.

 




Power Line Projects

The Dixie National Forest is the lead forest for three power line projects that will potentially impact all Utah forests. The Forest Service is not the lead agency; BLM is the lead agency.

Forest to Faucets Program

The Forests to Faucets Project identifies areas that supply surface drinking water, have consumer demand for this water, and are facing significant development threats.


Highlights

  • Newsletter:
    Intermountain Trails
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Key Contacts

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