Just for Kids

Students and Visitors

Planning a trip to a national forest or grassland this year? Want to learn more about firefighters, avalanche scientists, or forest researchers? Or do you want to find out more about the animals, plants and fungi (pronounced "fun guy") that live in the forests, or want to just take a hike?

Here are a few ways you can learn more about the national forests and grasslands, and about the caretakers for these lands, the Forest Service.

  • Every Kid Outdoors

    Every Kid Outdoors logo
     

    Every Kid Outdoors is a nationwide call to action to connect kids to nature. All fourth graders are eligible to receive an Every Kid Outdoors pass that allows free access to federal lands and waters across the country for a full year.

    See America’s natural wonders and historic sites for free! Learn more and download your free pass at the Every Kid Outdoors website.

  • Junior Ranger Program

    Forest Service shield
     

    Many forests offer summer programs for kids at popular forest recreation areas and visitor centers. You will learn about the forest, the living creatures you might see, and about the geology and watershed. After doing some fun activities, you will receive a Junior Forest Ranger booklet or badge. Check the forest's website or call the local ranger district office, to find out about Junior Forest Ranger programs, campfire programs or special hikes.

    Other Junior Ranger Programs:

  • Smokey Bear

    Smokey Bear with shovel
     

    Forests are amazing places covering almost a third of the Earth's land, including over 700 million acres in the United States (that’s about 529 million football fields!). Forests are home to a huge variety of plants and animals, providing them with food, water and shelter. Our forests are very valuable. Smokey Bear's message: "only you can prevent wildfires" is still as important today as it was decades ago. Read how you can help Smokey keep the forest GREEN.

  • Woodsy Owl

    Woodsy Owl picking up trash
     

    Hello! I’m Woodsy Owl. Since 1971, has inspired kids to care of natural resources. Woodsy's familiar slogan was first "Give a hoot, don't pollute" but now Woodsy invites you to join him - "Lend a Hand, Care for the Land". Do you know what that means? It means that if we all work together, the Earth will have clean air and water and will be a healthy place to live for trees and plants, fish, animals and birds like me! Oh, and it also means it will be clean for you, too! How will you help Woodsy take care of the forest or the city where you live?

  • Natural Inquirer

    A cartoon bee with a spyglass

    The Natural Inquirer program produces a variety of science education materials for Pre-K through grade 12. Check out videos, activities, collector cards, coloring books plus much more like virtual learning adventures!

  • Celebrating Wildflowers

    A butterfly hovering over wildflowers

    Learn more about wildflowers on our National Forests and Grasslands, and also about pollinators, gardening, invasive plant species, and ethnobotany. Enjoy our puzzles, coloring pages, and fun activities!

  • Seriously Sage Grouse

    A color drawing of a Sage Grouse bird

    Have fun kids with this activity book for 2nd through 5th graders. Learn what they look like, what they eat and where they live by filling in crossword puzzles and coloring in pictures and more.

Celebrate Arbor Day with tree graphicsA special day set aside for tree planting, Arbor Day was first observed in Nebraska in 1872 with the planting of more than a million trees. It expanded to the rest of the country in 1882 and since then communities around the U.S. have celebrated trees on the last Friday in April.

If your community has a special Arbor Day celebration, it may be a Tree City USA. In cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service and National Association of State Foresters, the Arbor Day Foundation provides the framework necessary for communities to manage and expand their public trees through the Tree City USA program.

Tree City USA is a popular program in the Intermountain Region with 87 communities achieving this status in Utah, 11 communities in Nevada, 68 communities in Idaho, and 41 communities in Wyoming. Find out more about Arbor Day and how you can celebrate in your community from the Arbor Day Foundation.

Arbor Day Fun Activities for Kids ~

 

Additional Conservation Education Websites