Motor Vehicle Use Maps (MVUM)

Motor Vehicle Use Maps are available for the 1.7 million acre Klamath National Forest. Motor Vehicle Use Maps (MVUM) are the official map for designating all roads, trails and areas available for public motorized travel on the National Forest. While other maps are available for trip planning purposes, the MVUM is the official map indicating where motor vehicle use is legal on the National Forest. If you find mistakes or would like to see other changes to the MVUM, please use this form as a guide and submit the form itself (hard-copy scanned) or any other comments here.

The Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) is a requirement of the 2005 Final Travel Management Rule and is a product of the 1995 Klamath National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, as amended and travel management decisions on each ranger district.

The MVUM displays National Forest Transportation System (NFTS) routes (roads and trails) or areas designated as open to motorized travel. The MVUM also displays allowed uses by vehicle class (e.g. highway-legal vehicles, vehicles less than 50 inches wide and motorcycles, seasonal designations, and provides information on other travel rules and regulations).

If a route is not shown on the MVUM, then it is not open to public motor vehicle travel. To help identify routes that are available for motor vehicle use, signs have been placed on the entrances to these roads and trails. However, since the MVUM includes the official information on designation of motor vehicle routes, it is the user’s responsibility to reference the MVUM, to stay on designated motor vehicle routes and follow terms of allowable use.  The MVUM will be updated annually to correct mapping errors or discrepancies and update travel decisions.

The MVUM is a black and white map with no topographic features. It is a map for legal designations of where you can travel with various motorized vehicles.  For additional reference it is best used in conjunction with a forest transportation map, Forest Visitor Map or other detailed map.

The MVUM is free to the public at each local Ranger District office and at the Headquarters Office. The MVUM is available on this website and sections of it may be printed from your home computer. The map is fully searchable using the find window at the top of the map. Type in the route number or other text and you will be taken to each occurrence of that number or text.

For more information on National and Regional Travel Management Policy and Implementation please see: USDA Forest Service Travel Management & Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Program

USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Region Travel Management

These color navigation maps are companions to the MVUMs, meant to help provide navigational aids and make the MVUM more useful.

If you do not already have a copy of Adobe Acrobat Reader you can download a copy from Adobe.

These maps are a companion to the Klamath National Forest Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM), to help porvide navigational aids such as landmarks not found on the MVUM.


Where can I get a MVUM?
Maps are posted and available for printing on this website and on the internet at both the Pacific Southwest Region and National Forest Service websites. Paper copies of the Klamath National Forest maps will be available free of charge at each of the Klamath National Forest Service offices in Yreka (Forest Supervisor’s Office), Macdoel, Happy Camp, Fort Jones and Orleans, California. Free paper copies of the Klamath National Forest maps will be available at these Forest Service offices starting in January 2013. Other partners and distribution locations may be developed over time to help disseminate maps.

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How many MVUM's are there for the Klamath National Forest?
There are five, two-sided maps and one single-sided map, for a total of six (6) maps. One side of each map has tables further defining routes, seasonality, and activities. The maps are listed above.

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How do I print the MVUM?
Full-size prints of the Klamath National Forest MVUM’s are 24" x 44".  Therefore, full-size versions of the MVUM’s cannot be printed on conventional home printers. A full-size version can only be printed from a large plotter. Many local engineering and survey businesses can print the map for a nominal fee.

To be readable, only a portion of the MVUM can be printed on 8 ½" x 11" paper using home printers. With Adobe Acrobat, use the “Print Current View” function to print the view on your screen. We recommend that the legend box, as well as applicable special designations, be printed to aid in interpretation of the MVUM. These tables and legends are also available as separate documents on the Motor Vehicle Use Map page on the Klamath National Forest web site.

Paper copies of the Klamath National Forest maps will be available free of charge at each of the Klamath National Forest Service offices in Yreka (Forest Supervisor’s Office), Macdoel, Happy Camp, Fort Jones and Orleans, California.

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What does the MVUM show me?
The MVUM shows the designated motorized roads, trails, and areas where the public can drive motorized vehicles. Motorized uses for special permits for things such as firewood and cattle grazing are covered under the conditions of the permit. The MVUM is the legal document directing motorized traffic in the Klamath National Forest. Signing on the ground is provided for additional help in identifying routes designated for motor vehicle use.  Information on understanding signing is included on the MVUM and in an accompanying brochure.

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Does the MVUM also show mechanized (bicycle) and non-motorized trails and over-snow vehicle uses?
No, the MVUM does not include these types of trails.  A number of other free and sale maps and items are available which include this information.  A tri-forest (Klamath, Shasta-Trinity and Modoc National Forests) snowmobile map identifying snowmobile routes is available at the Goosenest Ranger District Office.

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What is meant by vehicle class?
Vehicle class refers to a category of motorized vehicles. The following are typical vehicle class route designations:

  • Roads open to highway legal vehicles only
  • Roads open to all vehicles (licensed and unlicensed)
  • Trails open to vehicles 50” or less in width (ATV, motorcycle, etc.)
  • Trails open to all vehicles (trails may be rugged and narrow - intended for jeeps)
  • Trails open to motorcycles only (single track)


A designation of routes and areas as open to certain vehicle classes does not mean they are maintained for, or suitable, for travel using those vehicles. Such designation means it is legal to use them. For example, many low standard roads may be open to all motor vehicles. This designation includes passenger cars, although it may not be prudent to drive this type of vehicle on the route due to the condition of the surface or during inclement weather. Please check with the local Ranger District Offices for more information.

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Will there be any areas where I can travel cross-country with my vehicle?
Two areas, one 5 acres area and one 48 acre area, are designated open for cross-country travel.  

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What is a highway legal vehicle and how do I go about making my vehicle highway legal?
A highway-legal vehicle is any motor vehicle that is licensed or certified under state law for general operation on all public roads in the state. Operators of highway-legal vehicles are subject to state traffic law, including requirements for operator licensing. To determine if your vehicle is highway legal, or how to make your vehicle highway legal, contact your local state police or state DMV office.

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What are road maintenance levels and how do those affect open vs. closed roads?
Forest Service roads are divided into 5 maintenance levels. These are:

  • Level 1 – Closed to vehicular traffic but may be available and suitable for non-motorized uses.
  • Level 2 – Open to high clearance vehicles.
  • Level 3 – Assigned to roads open and maintained for travel by a prudent driver in a standard passenger car. User comfort and convenience are not considered priorities. Roads in this maintenance level are typically low speed with single lanes and turnouts.
  • Level 4 – Assigned to roads that provide a moderate degree of user comfort and convenience at moderate travel speeds. Most roads are double lane and aggregate surfaced. However, some roads may be single lane. Some roads may be paved and/or dust abated.
  • Level 5 – Assigned to roads that provide a high degree of user comfort and convenience. These roads are normally double lane, paved facilities.

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What is meant by season of use?
Some routes may be open only during certain times of the year for various reasons such as to reduce wildlife disturbance, protect users from unsafe or impassable conditions, to protect saturated (wet) road surface from damage/rutting, and to reduce impacts to other resource values.

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How far can I park off a designated route?
You may park a motor vehicle on the side of the road when it is safe to do so without causing damage to forest resources or facilities, unless prohibited by state law, a traffic sign, or an order. Parking is allowed within a specified distance of up to 30 feet from the edge of the road surface.

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How does this impact big game retrieval?
Motor vehicle use to retrieve big game is allowed only within 30 feet from the edge of a designated road.

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Can I camp on the side of the road with my RV, 5th wheel or pop-up camper?
Dispersed camping is permitted anywhere on the Klamath National Forest except for in developed recreation sites. Driving a motor vehicle to a dispersed camping site is permitted only on designated routes. The MVUM includes 20 miles of road to almost 200 traditionally-used dispersed recreation sites. You may also camp with a motor vehicle such as an RV, 5th wheel or pop-up camper within 30 feet of a designated road, including roads to traditionally-used dispersed recreation sites.

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Are there road and trail route marker signs on the ground?
Routes designated for motorized use have been signed as a help to locate designated roads and trails. A vertical sign means the road is open to all motor vehicles (these roads may also have a “Share-the-Road” sign). Horizontal signs mean highway-legal vehicles only (no OHV unless Share-the-Road signs are in place). The MVUM is the official identification of routes designated for motor vehicle use and provides information on the season of use and classes of allowable vehicles for each designated route. It is the responsibility of the user to determine if they are on a route designated motor vehicle use and for the type of vehicle being used.

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When will the MVUM become enforceable?
The MVUM is enforceable as of January 2, 2013. Forest Service employees will begin providing information on the MVUM as of that date.

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After MVUMs are available to the public in map form and on the web, what will be the Forest Service enforcement strategy?
Forest Service employees, including law enforcement employees and Forest Protection Officers, will continually check with the public to encourage compliance and clarify information printed on the MVUM. There will be a transition period to ensure that information on the requirements stated on the MVUM is known by the public. The public is asked to let their local Forest Service office know if they see some activity occurring that does not seem to be allowed by the MVUM. The Klamath National Forest is working with local and State governments to coordinate education and enforcement.

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What is the fine for violations?
Once the transition period is complete, and Forest users know about the requirements stated on the MVUM, violations will be issued. Violations of 36 CFR 261.13 are subject of a fine up to $5,000 and/or 6 months imprisonment (18 U.S.C. 3571(e)).

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What is the definition of a road?
A motor vehicle route over 50-inches wide, unless identified and managed as a trail (36 CFR 212.1).

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What is the definition of a trail?
A route 50“ or less in width or a route more than 50” wide that is identified and managed as a trail (36 CFR 212.1).

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Will trails be designated stating what width vehicles are allowed and will they be signed on-the-ground in that manner?
Trails are signed in the field; however, vehicle widths are not displayed on the signs. The MVUM indicates appropriate vehicle designations and widths.

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What are the licensing requirements for California residents and out of state visitors?

Users should contact the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) or the State police in California and Oregon for licensing requirements, depending on which state includes the designated road or trail. Most of the designated roads and trails on the Klamath National Forest are in California but some are in Oregon.

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What are some of the opportunities for OHV's, ATV's, jeeps and motorcycles?
If these are not licensed motor vehicles, their use is permitted on designated roads and trails identified on the Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) as available for non-highway legal vehicles and in open riding areas identified on the MVUM. Ask at your local Forest Service office for specific opportunities or visit our web site at www.fs.usda.gov/klamath.

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Where can I park and unload my ATV?
Parking is available at both Humbug and Juniper Flats open riding area.  See the Motor Vehicle Use Map for your area of interest.

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Will there be any special allowances for hunting for disabled hunters with special permits from the State of California?
The Forest Service provides a quality network of roads, trail and areas available for public motorized use.  Using this network, no special provision is needed for people with disabilities who depend on motorized transportation to enjoy the Forest.  Allowing people with disabilities to use OHVs or other motor vehicles on roads, trails, and areas closed to motor vehicle use is not authorized.  People with disabilities may use motorized wheelchairs and similar devices (devices normally used within a residential setting) to travel anywhere in the Forest.

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Can you drive greater than 30 feet off a system road to load firewood?
Yes, in General Firewood Cutting areas on the Goosenest Ranger District valid firewood permit holders can drive up to 100 feet from open system roads to load firewood. Refer to the Motor Vehicle Use Map for open system roads. Driving greater than 30 feet off an open system road is not allowed on the Happy Camp, Oak Knoll, Scott River, and Salmon River Ranger Districts. See Ranger District specific Cutting Conditions on the Personal Use Firewood Map accompanying the firewood permit.

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What type of vehicle should I purchase so I will meet the requirements of the new MVUM?
See definitions of specific vehicles and Motor Vehicle Map Legends and information.

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I want to collect special forest products such as pine cones, poles, limbs or boughs or stumps. What are the guidelines for retrieving them with a motor vehicle?
See specific provisions of the special forest product permit and ask at Forest Service offices for specific information.

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Will there be a companion piece or user guide that identifies scenic rides?
Supplemental materials and guides are available to assist the public to use the designated system.  Some materials are available in paper format at Forest Service offices, and some are available on-line at www.fs.usda.gov/klamath.

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