Target Shooting

  

Target shooting

Shooting sports are a popular activity on public lands around Central Oregon. While target shooting is allowed in many locations on the Ochoco National Forest and Crooked River National Grassland, the following considerations will make your visit safe and enjoyable.

Know the law. According to 36 CFR 261.10 (d), (1) It is prohibited to discharge a firearm within 150 yards of a residence, building, campsite, developed site or occupied area, or (2) across a National Forest System Road or in any manner or place whereby any person or property is exposed to any injury or damage.  

Exploding targets, tannerite, and incendiary and tracer ammunition are prohibited on Forest Service lands (36 CFR 261.52(b). An explosive is defined as any chemical compound, mixture, or device, the primary or common purpose of which is to function by explosion. 

Consider other forest users and neighboring land owners. Avoid areas with the potential to impact people, livestock, wildlife, and sensitive resources when selecting a target shooting location. The sound of firearms discharging can understandably be unsettling to others. Areas near campgrounds, private lands, trailheads, trails, roads and other locations where other people may be in the area are not suitable as target shooting locations. Thoroughly scout the area! Don’t assume a remote area is unoccupied—livestock grazing, hunting, forest products harvest, and other activities bring many users deep into the forest. 

The popular target shooting area along the 5700 road on the north side of Pine Ridge on the Crooked River National Grassland frequently sees conflicts between trail users and target shooters. The area is located near the Cole Loop Trail, and many user-created target shooting locations are dangerously close to the trail. Target shooters should follow the law and the guidelines above when shooting in this area. For a map of this area, click here.

Consider wildfire risk. Hot bullets can ignite wildfires, so be aware of fuel conditions and use care during the hot, dry summer months. Shooting at rocks, signs, metal, or other unsuitable objects can create sparks and ignite wildfires. Some types of ammunition, such as steel and copper, have a greater potential to ignite wildfires.

This flyer has more tips on reducing wildfire risk while target shooting.

Leave no trace. Pick up and pack out shells and other garbage after target shooting. Do not leave targets in the woods, bring in appliances or other refuse for targets, or paint targets on trees or logs. Leave the area in a condition that others may enjoy and appreciate. Practicing good stewardship helps to assure popular target shooting areas remain open in the future.

Consider personal safety. Choose an area affording complete visibility and direct shots into a suitable backstop, such as an open hillside. Don’t shoot alone, and let someone know of your plans and expected return time. Follow the four essential rules of firearm safety:

1–Treat every firearm as if it were loaded.

2–Always keep the muzzle pointed in a safe direction.

3–Be sure of your target and aware of what is beyond it.

4–Keep your finger outside of the trigger guard until you are ready to shoot.

As always, please contact our Prineville or Madras offices for current conditions and restrictions.

 

 

Activities


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Target Shooting

Shooting sports are a popular activity on public lands around Central Oregon. While target shooting is allowed in many locations on the Ochoco National Forest and Crooked River National Grassland, the following considerations will make your visit safe and enjoyable.

Know the law. According to 36 CFR 261.10 (d), (1) It is prohibited to discharge a firearm within 150 yards of a residence, building, campsite, developed site or occupied area, or (2) across a National Forest System Road or in any manner or place whereby any person or property is exposed to any injury or damage.  

Exploding targets, tannerite, and incendiary and tracer ammunition are prohibited on Forest Service lands (36 CFR 261.52(b). An explosive is defined as any chemical compound, mixture, or device, the primary or common purpose of which is to function by explosion. 

Consider other forest users and neighboring land owners. Avoid areas with the potential to impact people, livestock, wildlife, and sensitive resources when selecting a target shooting location. The sound of firearms discharging can understandably be unsettling to others. Areas near campgrounds, private lands, trailheads, trails, roads and other locations where other people may be in the area are not suitable as target shooting locations. Thoroughly scout the area! Don’t assume a remote area is unoccupied—livestock grazing, hunting, forest products harvest, and other activities bring many users deep into the forest. 

The popular target shooting area along the 5700 road on the north side of Pine Ridge on the Crooked River National Grassland frequently sees conflicts between trail users and target shooters. The area is located near the Cole Loop Trail, and many user-created target shooting locations are dangerously close to the trail. Target shooters should follow the law and the guidelines above when shooting in this area. For a map of this area, click here.

Consider wildfire risk. Hot bullets can ignite wildfires, so be aware of fuel conditions and use care during the hot, dry summer months. Shooting at rocks, signs, metal, or other unsuitable objects can create sparks and ignite wildfires. Some types of ammunition, such as steel and copper, have a greater potential to ignite wildfires.

This flyer has more tips on reducing wildfire risk while target shooting.

Leave no trace. Pick up and pack out shells and other garbage after target shooting. Do not leave targets in the woods, bring in appliances or other refuse for targets, or paint targets on trees or logs. Leave the area in a condition that others may enjoy and appreciate. Practicing good stewardship helps to assure popular target shooting areas remain open in the future.

Consider personal safety. Choose an area affording complete visibility and direct shots into a suitable backstop, such as an open hillside. Don’t shoot alone, and let someone know of your plans and expected return time. Follow the four essential rules of firearm safety:

1–Treat every firearm as if it were loaded.

2–Always keep the muzzle pointed in a safe direction.

3–Be sure of your target and aware of what is beyond it.

4–Keep your finger outside of the trigger guard until you are ready to shoot.

As always, please contact our Prineville or Madras offices for current conditions and restrictions.

Areas & Activities


https://www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/ochoco/recreation/otheractivities/recarea/?recid=82848&actid=106