Climbing

Built by volcanoes and scraped by glaciers, the exposed bedrock of the Superior National Forest is some of the oldest in the world and provides some excellent opportunities for climbing. While we have no true mountains, there are many sheer cliffs and rocky knobs that provide places to climb, rappel, and boulder.

There are no designated or maintained climbing areas on the Forest, so climbers are on their own to choose, plan, and execute safe climbs.  Climbers should use temporary anchors and hardware, and be wary of any anchors left behind by other climbers.  Any anchors you may find were not installed or maintained by the Forest Service.

Finally, leave adequate information about your climb and route with others, including a return date. When planning, remember that much of the Forest does not have cell phone coverage, and consider alternative methods of emergency contact.



https://www.fs.usda.gov/activity/superior/recreation/climbing