Frequently Asked Questions

If camping is your interest, we have a special page just for Camping Frequently Asked Questions.  For answers to a variety of other questions, just click on the link below.

  1. What is the difference between the Forest Service, the National Park Service, Department of Wildlife Resources and State Parks?

  2. What are passes are available for recreation activities?

  3. How do I reserve a campsite?

  4. Are there fire restrictions in place? How do I know if I can have a campfire?

  5. Where can I get maps to know where I can ride my ATV, motorcycle or motorized recreational vehicle?

  6. Where can I get maps that show where recreation opportunities on the National Forest are?

  7. Can I take my dog hiking or camping on the National Forest?

  8. Where can I get a permit for Forest Products?

  9. What is a Wilderness Area?

  10. Do I need to have certified weed-free hay on the National Forest for my horses?

  11. Is horse back riding only allowed on trails, or is cross-country riding allowed?
  12. Do landowners adjacent to the forest have access (walking or by horse) to the forest from their property, or are they required to use a designated trail head or another designated point of entry?
  13. Are there limits to the size of groups (including hikers) that can go into the forest or a specific wilderness area?
  14. If I have an emergency on the National Forest, who should I contact?

  15. Why are there so many dead trees on the forest? What is being done about this problem?
  16. How can we purchase seedlings for planting native trees from the Dixie forest.

What is the difference between the Forest Service, the National Park Service, Department of Wildlife Resources and State Parks?

 

The Forest Service manages the national forests and grasslands, forestry research and cooperation with forest managers on State and Private Lands. The Forest Service is dedicated to multiple-use management for the sustained yield of renewable resources such as water, forage, wildlife, wood and recreation. Multiple-use means managing resources under the best combination of uses to benefit the American people while ensuring the productivity of the land and protecting the quality of the environment.

The National Park Service focuses on preservation. They preserve, unimpaired, the natural and cultural resources and values of the national park system for the enjoyment, education, and inspiration of this and future generations. The Park Service cooperates with partners to extend the benefits of natural and cultural resource conservation and outdoor recreation.

State Parks are similar to National Parks but are managed on a state level and can have fewer restrictions.

Department of Wildlife Resources (DWR) can be under state or federal management. State DWRs handle fishing and hunting permits while federal wildlife agencies, such as the National Marine Fisheries Service, manage wildlife that crosses state boundaries such as migratory birds and whales and some fish species.
 

What passes are available for recreation activities?

 

Entrance fees are required for entering designated federal recreation areas such as National Parks and National Monuments. Entrance fees can be paid each time you visit a forest or grassland, or you can use a special pass, such as the America the Beautiful - National Parks and Federal Lands Recreation Pass. For more information on recreation passes, visit the Forest Service Recreation Fees and Passes web site.

Federal Interagency Senior and Access Pass Information (printable pdf document) - These passes are issued to United States citizens or permanent residents only. Senior passes are for persons over 62 years old. Access passes are for persons that have a permanent disability.

Some specific recreation areas may have unique restrictions and fees that may not be covered by the pass. If you have a question pertaining to a location, contact that area for more information.

There are three types of fees that may be charged.

  1. Entrance Fees are charged for entering designated federal recreation areas.
     
  2. Use Fees are charged for using visitor services such as campgrounds, swimming areas, boat launches, parking, waterfowl blinds, cave tours or specialized interpretive services in designated federal recreation areas.
     
  3. Special Recreation Permit Fees are charged for specialized uses that require a permit, such as group activities, recreational events and the use of motorized recreational vehicles in designated federal recreation areas.
     

How do I reserve a campsite?

Check our Recreation Section for information on camping and campsites.  Here you will find information about each campground or campsite, including how to makes reservations if required.  As an alternative for Forests Service campgrounds reservations nationwide you can call 1-877-444-6777. If you call the toll free number, the exact name of the campground and the Forest it is located on is needed. You can also visit the Forest Service campground reservations web site at  Recreation.gov. The web site offers interactive, clickable maps that lists campgrounds by state and will have the name of the specific campgrounds and forests. It also has directions and campground maps.

 

Are their fire restrictions in place? How do I know if I can have a campfire?

 

Fire restrictions can change frequently as weather and drought conditions vary. For the most accurate information it is best to call your local Forest Service office. Fire restrictions can also be different for developed campground vs. dispersed campgrounds. Please contact us for restrictions that are specific to areas within the Dixie National Forest.
 

Where can I get maps that show where I can ride my ATV, motorcycle or motorized recreational vehicle?

 The Motorized Travel Planning Project Implementation page has detailed information about ATV/OHV use on the Forest, including maps available for download.

Travel plan maps and motorized trail maps have the most accurate information regarding trails that are open to ATV's and motorized recreational vehicles. These maps are available at most Ranger District and Forest Service offices, as well as the Visitor Centers which are located near popular recreation areas. It is suggested that all ATV/OHV recreationists obtain maps, since the ATV maps cover trails and proper ATV/OHV use on the Dixie National Forest.

To purchase maps by telephone, please see our  Maps For Sale web page for a list of maps available for sale. You may contact us to find out how to obtain maps for the Dixie National Forest and surrounding areas. Some maps are available for purchase on-line through the National Forest Store. The Dixie National Forest has several maps that are available for free.  Maps can be acquired by visiting one of our offices, by phone, or by mail.  There are also several maps that are available for download.
 

Where can I get maps that show where recreation opportunities on the National Forest are?

 

Topographic maps provide the greatest amount of detail for a small portion of land, are available from the USGS or many local retail outlets. Local Ranger Districts and Forest Service offices have larger National Forest overview maps that show the locations of campgrounds, paved roads, unimproved roads and some trails. Ranger Districts and Forest Service offices will also have Travel Plan maps that show trails that are open to motorized recreational vehicles and ATV's. Maps are also available at Visitor Centers, which can be found near popular recreation areas.

To purchase maps by telephone, please see our Maps For Sale web page for a list of maps available for sale. You may contact us to find out how to obtain maps for the Dixie National Forest and surrounding areas. Some maps are available for purchase on-line through the National Forest Store.
 

Can I take my dog hiking or camping on the National Forest?

Yes, dogs are welcome on the Dixie National Forest. For safety, all dogs must be on a leash in all campgrounds, picnic areas and trailheads at all times. Please do not leave your pet unattended. Remember, never leave a pet unattended in a vehicle. Even mountain temperatures can make the interior of a vehicle uncomfortably hot.
 

Where can I get a permit for Forest Products?

 

Examples of Forest Products are firewood, Christmas trees and ornamental Rocks to mention a few. More information can be found on our Passes and Permits web page. For more specific information contact the local Ranger District.
 

What is a Wilderness Area?

 

Wilderness areas are a place where the imprint of humans is substantially unnoticed. It is where natural processes are the primary influences and human activity is limited to primitive recreation and minimum tools. This allows for the experience of wild places without intention to disturb or destroy the natural processes. Wilderness areas on the Dixie National Forest do not require an overnight permit to camp in them. Contact your local forest service office for more information on wilderness areas and any restrictions that may apply to using them.
 

Do I need to have certified weed-free hay on the National Forest for my horses?

 

Virtually all forests in the Intermountain Region require certified weed-free hay. You can contact you local forest service office if you have questions. Utah Department of Agriculture. Click onto the "weed-free-hay" link to find locations where certified weed-free-hay can be obtained. For complete information regarding your area of interest please contact us.
 

Is horse back riding only allowed on trails, or is cross-country riding allowed?

Cross country horse back riding is allowed.

 

Do landowners adjacent to the forest have access (walking or by horse) to the forest from their property, or are they required to use a designated trail head or another designated point of entry?

Anyone on foot or horse can enter the forest at any point as long as they have access over the adjacent private property.

 

Are there limits to the size of groups (including hikers) that can go into the forest or a specific wilderness area?

In general forest areas, there are no group size limits. However, if the party is greater than 75 participants/spectators, a noncommercial group use special use permit may be required. in wilderness areas, the total number of people and stock can be no larger than 25.

 

If I have an emergency on the National Forest, who should I contact?

 

If you have an emergency on the National Forest, the best thing to do is call 911 and they will dispatch the nearest help.

 

Why are there so many dead trees on the forest? What is being done about this problem?

In 1991, several areas of dead trees killed by spruce beetles were detected by aerial survey. Over the next few years, the Dixie National Forest implemented several tree removal projects, hoping to suppress the spread of the infestation by removing infested trees and reducing the density of the forest. By 1996, however, it was clear that the epidemic could not be suppressed. Read more...

 

How can we purchase seedlings for planting native trees from the Dixie forest.

If you are interested in seedlings, you need to get in touch with the State Forester office. The telephone number is 435-586-4408. You can get a permit from the Forest Service to dig up a tree to transplant. They cannot be taller than 6' and cost $5 each. There is a $20 minimum permit. These permits may be obtained at any District Office.