Flora Threatened and Endangered

Español

Plants Conservation Concern

 

Flora Threatened and Endangered Species and Species of Conservation Concern

The Forest has a total of 830 flora species; of those, 636 were evaluated to determine which should categorized as federally listed species and species of conservation concern. This evaluation resulted in 8 federally listed species and 39 species of conservation concern.

Throughout El Yunque, T&E species protection and habitat enhancement is a priority, so their needs are particularly emphasized.  The overall affected environment can be summarized as a tropical rainforest within the Caribbean Basin located between North American and South America. The vegetation on El Yunque is consistent with Tropical Wet Rain forests and is arranged into 15 new vegetation types.

All federally listed T&E species continue to be managed and protected across the Forest in accordance with Forest Service policy, recommended protection measures in the recovery plans, and all applicable state and Federal laws. Individual projects during the next planning period may result in direct negative effects to an individual, but effects analysis and consultation will take place at the project level should this situation ever occur.

For more information refer to the Final Environmental Impact Statement and the Forest Plan.

 

Endangered Species

Capá rosa (Callicarpa ampla): Endangered

Callicarpa ampla (Verbenaceae) is an evergreen shrub with simple, opposite leaves. It is only found in Puerto Rico at EYNF in the Tabonuco type forest. The species is only found on EYNF in the municipalities of Rio Grande and Naguabo in three different populations (two natural and one planted), for a total of 18 known individuals.  All known Callicarpa sites are located in protected lands. Because of the distance between the populations, genetic material is not expected to be exchanged, except for the one in El Portal which contains genetic material (clones) from both natural populations. 

 

Uvillo (Eugenia haematocarpa): Endangered

Eugenia haematocarpa (Myrtaceae) is an evergreen tree that can reach 6 m (20 ft.). Its distribution is the Sierra de Luquillo in EYNF and the Sierra de Cayey. Known habitat is Secondary Montane and Mature Tabonuco Montane forest types, which grow on volcanic substrate.

During the 2011 botanical survey, two populations were located at EYNF, one in Rio Grande in El Verde area with 27 individuals and one in Rio Gurabo with 12 individuals. When Uvillo was listed as an endangered species in 1998, 119 individuals were reported within six populations; however, these other populations were not evaluated during the 2011 survey. 

 

Guayabota pequeña (Ilex sintenisii): Endangered

Ilex sintenissi (Aquifoliaceae) is a shrub/small tree with alternate leaves. Its distribution is limited to EYNF, specifically to Pico El Yunque and Pico del Este. These areas are located in the cloud forest type, which grow above 600m in elevation on volcanic substrate.  As of 2011, there were approximately 465 individuals on 23 populations, an increase from the 150-200 individuals in three populations identified during the 1995 recovery plan.

Known habitat is Mature Tabebuia/Eugenia woodland montane rain cloud forest type. See the 2014 Forest Plan Assessment “Terrestrial Ecosystems” section for a detailed description of this vegetation type. See the 2014 Forest Plan Assessment “At-Risk Flora” section for a detailed description of this species.

 

Lepanthes eltoroensis: Endangered

Lepanthes eltoroensis (Orchidaceae) is a small epiphytic orchid. It grows on the north-face (non-windy) side of moss covered trunks on upper elevations (above 750 m) in the Sierra Palm, Palo Colorado and Mature Tabebuia/Eugenia Woodland Montane Wet Cloud Forest types. The population was estimated at 360 individuals at the time of listing and recent estimates based on surveys and expert opinions indicate a range of 3,000 individuals.

See the 2014 Forest Plan Assessment “At-Risk Flora” section for a detailed description of this species. This vegetation type is located inside El Toro Wilderness.

 

Chupacallos (Pleodendron macranthum): Endangered

Pleodendron macranthum (Canellaceae) is an evergreen tree, for which there are 2 known populations with 11 individuals at EYNF; however none of these individuals were located during the 2011 botanical survey. There are 25 planted individuals, 3 at El Portal Visitor Center and 22 at Puerto Rican Parrot Aviary. Known habitat is Secondary Montane and Mature Tabonuco Montane forest types. See the 2014 Forest Plan Assessment “At-Risk Flora” section for a detailed description of this species.

 

Palo de Jazmín (Styrax portoricensis): Endangered

Styrax portoricensis (Styracaceae) is an evergreen tree for which its known habitat is Secondary Montane, Mature Tabonuco Montane and Mature Palo Colorado Montane Wet Cloud Forest types. There were 19 reported individuals at EYNF, however during the last botanical survey, none of these populations were recorded. About 50 individuals were planted by FWS around the Puerto Rican Parrot Aviary.

 

Palo Colorado (Ternstroemia luquillensis): Endangered

Ternstroemia luquillensis (Pentaphylacaceae) is an evergreen tree that can reach 20 m. Its population is limited to 6 known individuals from 4 populations within the Mature Palo Colorado Montane, Mature Tabonuco and Montane Cloud forest types, although two individuals may have been misidentified. 

 

Ternstroemia subsessilis: Endangered

Ternstroemia subsessilis (Pentaphylacaceae) is an evergreen tree/shrub with alternate leaves that can grow up to 5 m. It had approximately 37 individuals distributed among 4 populations; however during the last survey in 2011, those populations could not be found. Known habitat are Mature Palo Colorado Montane, Mature Sierra Palm Montane and Mature Tabebuia/Eugenia Woodland Montane Rain Cloud forest types.

 

Species of Conservation Concern – Flora

A brief description of the ecology and distribution for the species of conservation concern for El Yunque:

Orchids

Of the 149 orchid species reported to Puerto Rico, 45 percent are reported as being native to the Luquillo Mountains (Kasomenakis 1988). Seven endemic species and one native are considered at-risk species and have been proposed for further analysis as species of conservation concern for El Yunque National Forest. These are small plants that range in size from several millimeters to 14 centimeters tall. They are epiphytic plants found in a variety of environments, from mossy boulders along streams to moss covered tree trunks and branches in Wet Mountain and Wet Mountain Cloud Forest and on sphagnum moss on the peaks forest floor. Two of them Brachionidium ciliolatum and Lepanthes selenitepala are endemic to the Luquillo Mountains. Some are also present in the Sierra de Cayey and the Cordillera Central (on State Forests), but there is an overall lack of information on the population locations and sizes. The altitudinal ranges go from 215 meters to 1,300 meters above sea level.

They are mostly threatened by vegetation management affecting forest canopy, road and trail right of way maintenance, hurricane winds, landslides, low population numbers and some unauthorized collecting.

Hurricanes are a major threat to orchids, since their small sizes and restricted population ranges make them vulnerable to the strong winds which could tear them from their host and/or knock the host tree to the ground.

Climate change that affects the humidity required for the different forest types where they thrive may impair the moss layers in the different forest compartments where they are present, directly impacting their survival, reproduction, and population sizes.

 

Taxonomic Group Taxonomic Subroup Species Common Name
Vascular Plant  Orchid

 

Brachionidium ciliolatum

 

B. Ciliolatum

Vascular Plant  Orchid Brachionidium parvum B. Parvum
Vascular Plant  Orchid Lepanthes caritensis Carite babyfoot orchid
Vascular Plant  Orchid Lepanthes dodiana Dodiana babyfoot orchid
Vascular Plant  Orchid Lepanthes selenitepala spp ackermanii

 

Ackerman babyfoot orchid

Vascular Plant  Orchid Lepanthes stimsonii Stimson babyfoot orchid
Vascular Plant  Orchid Lepanthes veleziana Velez babyfoot orchid
Vascular Plant  Orchid Lepanthes woodburyana Woodbury babyfoot orchid

 

Vines

There are two vines proposed as species of conservation concern, one (Gonocalix portoricensis) is endemic to El Yunque and restricted to the peaks, and the other is endemic to Puerto Rico (Mikania pachyphyla) (Table 3- 29). The latter is present also in the Cordillera Central; its population is estimated at 2,946 individuals, but the population in El Yunque has not being determined or mapped. G. portoricensis population is being estimated to be eight individuals.

They are mostly threatened by vegetation management affecting forest canopy, road and trail right-of-way maintenance, hurricane winds, low population numbers, and landslides.

Climate change that affects the humidity required for the different forest types where they thrive may impair its persistence at El Yunque.

 

Taxonomic Group Taxonomic Subgroup Species Common Name
Vascular Plant  Vine Gonocalix portoricensis Gonocalyx (endemic)
Vascular Plant  Vine Mikania pachyphyla

Mikania (endemic)

 

Shrubs

There are 11 endemic shrub species recommended as species of conservation concern on El Yunque, of which 4 are endemic to the Luquillo Mountains (Marlierea sintenisii, Miconea faveolata, Varronia wagnerorum, and Solanum woodbury). There are seven plant families represented in this group (Table 3- 29).

All of these species are reported or estimated to have small populations, making the species vulnerable to any disturbance that may change the vegetation structure of the Forest, its geomorphology, or its landform morphology.

The principal immediate threat to all these species on El Yunque is the lack of information about their population numbers and location so that we can monitor the effects of stresses such as climate change, hurricane winds, landslides and canopy (structure) changes. Shrubs are part of the ground cover vegetation strata and are a key element in the food web of the Forest.

Hurricanes are particulary a major threat and considering the lack of information on their current population status, then analyzing the effects is difficult. H[AP-1] urricanes Irma and Maria, which recently passed over El Yunque on September 2017, likely further affected these populations. 

 

Taxonomic Group Taxonomic Subgroup Species Common Name
Vascular Plant  Shrub Brunfelsia lactea Jazmin de monte  (endemic)
Vascular Plant  Shrub

Brunfelsia portoricensis

Jazmin portoricensis (endemic)
Vascular Plant  Shrub Marlierea sintenisii Beruquillo 
Vascular Plant  Shrub Miconia foveolata Camasey
Vascular Plant  Shrub Solanum woodbury Solanum (endemic)
Vascular Plant  Shrub Urera chorocalpa Ortiga (endemic)
Vascular Plant  Shrub

Varronia wagnerorum

Varronia (endemic)
Vascular Plant Shrub/Small tree

Cybianthus sintenisii

Cybianthus (endemic)
Vascular Plant  Shrub/Small tree Eugenia egersii

Palo de murta (endemic)

Vascular Plant 

Shrub/Small tree

Xylosma schwaneckeana Palo de Candela  (endemic)
Vascular Plant  Small tree

Miconia pycnoneura

Camasey

 

Trees

There are 15 species in this group recommended for species of conservation concern; 8 endemic, 4 native, and 3 endemic to El Yunque (Magnolia splendens, Calyptrantes luquillensis and Ternstroemia heptasepala) (Table 3- 29). They represent 12 plant families. All of the species listed (except the Magnolia) thrive under the dominant canopy of the Forest (they are small trees, 50 feet at the tallest). All of them are reported or estimated to have small populations making them vulnerable to any disturbance that may change the vegetation structure of the Forest, its geomorphology, or its landform morphology.

The principal immediate threat to all these species in El Yunque is the lack of information about their population numbers and location so that we can monitor the effects of stresses or disturbances as climate change, hurricane winds, landslides and canopy (structure) changes. This is also true for all Species of Conservation Concern.

Magnolia splendens – Laurel Sabino (G3)

This species is endemic to the Luquillo Mountains and the only known populations are inside El Yunque. It is native to an area where tree growth is slow, 0.06 inches diameter increase in a period of 5 years from a sample of 46 trees. Most seeds apparently are sterile; this fact greatly limits the future of this tree. Young trees are being encouraged wherever they appear naturally; its range is between 400 to 850 meters of elevation above sea level. This means that part of the population is expected to be inside the Cloud Forest (Functional Wetland). During the 1930s the use of mature trees for furniture and cabinet making by the Civilian Conservation Corps dramatically reduced the mature population of this species (Little and Wadsworth 1964).

The Department of the Environment and Natural Resources of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico classifies the species as a “critical element” based on its classification code. It is a species to be monitored to determine its actual present range, population sizes and locations, phenology, and reproduction efforts.

 

Taxonomic Group Taxonomic Subgroup Species Common Name
Vascular Plant 

Tree

Ardisia luquillensis

Mamayuelo  (endemic)

Vascular Plant  Tree Banara portoricensis Caracolillo (endemic)
Vascular Plant  Tree

Calyptranthes luquillensis

C. Luquillensis (endemic)
Vascular Plant  Tree Calyptranthes woodburyi C. Woodburyi (endemic)
Vascular Plant  Tree

Coccoloba rugosa

Ortegon
Vascular Plant  Tree Conostegia hotteana Camasey peludo
Vascular Plant  Tree Laplacea portoricensis

Maricao verde

Vascular Plant  Tree Magnolia splendens Laurel sabino (endemic)
Vascular Plant 

 

Tree

Maytenus elongata

 

Cuero de Sapo

Vascular Plant  Tree Morella holdrigeana Palo de cera (endemic)
Vascular Plant  Tree Psidium sintenisii Hoja menuda (endemic)
Vascular Plant  Tree Ravenia urbanii Tortugo prieto (endemic)
Vascular Plant  Tree Symplocos lanata Nispero cimarron (endemic)
Vascular Plant 

Tree

Ternstroemia heptasepala

Palo colorado (endemic)

Vascular Plant  Tree

Ternstroemia stahlii

Palo de buey (endemic)

 

Ferns and Herbs

There are three species in this group, one endemic to El Yunque (Pilea multicaulis), and three endemic to Puerto Rico (Table 3- 29). Three species are reported to range between 650 and 1,300 meters of elevation above sea level in the Cloud Forest (Functional Wetland). The population in El Yunque still needs to be assessed. Lindsaea stricta var. jamesoniiformis is the only fern in this group.

All of these species are reported or estimated to have small population that renders the species vulnerable to any disturbance that may change the vegetation structure of the Forest, its geomorphology, or its landform morphology.

The principal immediate threat to all these species at El Yunque is the lack of information about their population numbers and location to be able to monitor the effects of stresses or disturbances as climate change, hurricane winds, landslides and canopy changes.

Taxonomic Group Taxonomic Subgroup Species Common Name
Vascular Plant  Fern Lindsaea stricta var. jamesoniformis Lindsaea
Vascular Plant  Herb Pilea multicaulis P. Multicaulis
Vascular Plant 

Herb

Pilea yunquensis

P. Yunquensis (endemic)


 

Especies de Flora en la lista de protección federal y de Prioridad para Conservación

El Bosque Nacional tiene un total de 830 especies de plantas y de esas se evaluaron 636 para determinar las plantas que deberían categorizarse como especies en lista de protección federal y Especies con Prioridad para Conservación. Tal evaluación resultó en 8 especies para la lista de protección federal y 39 Especies con Prioridad para Conservación.

En El Yunque, protección y mejoramiento de hábitat de especies amenazadas y en peligro de extonción es una prioridad, por lo que sus necesidades son particularmente enfatizadas. El ambiente afectado en general puede ser resumido como un bosque pluvioso dentro de la Cuenca del Caribe ubicado entre Norte y Suramérica. La vegetación en El Yunque es consistente y está organizado en 15 tipos de vegetación nuevos (vea sección 3.4.3.1).

Todas las especies amenazadas o en peligro de extinción listadas a nivel federal continuarían siendo manejadas y protegidas a través del Bosque de acuerdo a política del Servicio Forestal, medidas de protección recomendadas en los planes de recuperación, y todas las leyes federales y estatales eplicables. Proyectos individuales durante el período de planificación podrían resultar en efectos negativos directos a un individuo, pero análisis de efectos y consulta tomarán lugar lugar a nivel de proyecto si esta situación fuese a ocurrir.

Para obtener más información, consulte la Declaración de Impacto Ambiental Final y el Plan de Manejo.

 

Especies en lista de protección federal

Callicarpa ampla – Capá rosa: en peligro de extinción

Callicarpa ampla (Verbenaceae) es un arbusto siempreverde con hojas simples y opuestas. Es solo encontrado en Puerto Rico en El Yunque en los bosques de tabonuco en los municipios de Río Grande y Naguabo en tres poblaciones (dos naturales y una sembrada), para un total de 18 individuos. Todos los sitios donde se encuentra Callicarpa están ubicados en terrenos protegidos. Dado a la distancia entre poblaciones, no se espera un intercambio de material genético, excepto a la población sembrada, que contiene material genético (clones) de ambas poblaciones naturales.

Véase la sección de la Evaluación del Plan de Manejo 2014, Evaluación de la sostenibilidad ecológica y diversidad de comunidades de plantas y animales (ecosistemas terrestres), para una descripción detallada de este tipo de bosque. Véase también la sección de la Evaluación del Plan de Manejo 2014, Evaluación de las especies amenazadas, en peligro de extinción, propuestas, candidatas y potenciales Especies con Prioridad para Conservación (flora en riesgo), para una descripción detallada de esta especie.

 

Eugenia haematocarpa – Uvillo: en peligro de extinción

Eugenia haematocarpa (Myrtaceae) es un árbol siempreverde qye puede alcanzar los 20 pies de altura. Su distribución es a largo de la Sierra de Luquillo en El Yunque y la Sierra de Cayey, Su habitat conocido son los tipos de bosque maduros y secundarios montanos de tabonuco, los cuales crecen en sustratos volcánicos.

Durante el estudio botánico de 2011, dos poblaciones fueron encontradas en El Yunque, una en Río Grande en el área de El Verde, con 27 individuos, y una en el Río Gurabo, con 12 individuos. Cuando el Uvillo fue clasificado como una especie en peligro de extinción en 1998, 119 individuos fueron reportados entre 6 poblaciones; sin embargo, estas otras poblaciones no fueron evaluadas en el estudio de 2011. Véase la evaluación para la flora en riesgo, para una descripción detallada de esta especie.

 

Ilex sintenisii - Guayabota pequeña: en peligro de extinción

Ilex sintenisii (Aquifoliaceae) es un arbusto/árbol pequeño con hojas alternas. Su ditribución está limitada a El Yunque, específicamente a Pico El Yunque y Pico del Este. Estas áreas están ubicadas en el tipo de bosque nuboso, el cual crece sobre los 600 metros de elevación en sustrato volcánico. A partir de 2011, habían aproximadamente 465 individuos entre 23 poblaciones, un aumento de 150-200 individuos en tres poblaciones identificadas durante el plan de recuperación de 1995.

Su hábitat conocido es el tipo de vegetación bosque maduro pluvial nuboso montano de Tabebuia/Eugenia. Véase la evaluación de ecosistemas terrestres, para una descripción detallada de este tipo de bosque. Véase la evaluación para la flora en riesgo, para una descripción detallada de esta especie.

 

Lepanthes eltoroensis : en peligro de extinción

Lepanthes eltoroensis (Orchidaceae) es una pequeña orquídea epifítica. Crece en el lado norte de tronces de árboles cubiertos de musgos en altas elevaciones (sobre los 750 metros) en los tipos de bosques maduros muy húmedos nubosos montanos de palo colorado, palma de sierra y Eugenia/Tabebuia. Se estima que la población tiene 360 individuos al momento de clasificarla y estimados recientes en base a estudios y opiniones de expertos indican un rango de 3,000 individuos.

 

Pleodendron macranthum – Chupacallos: en peligro de extinción

Pleodendron macranthum (Canellaceae) es un árbol siempreverde, para el cual se conocen 2 poblaciones con 11 individuos en El Yunque; sin embargo, nunguno de estos individuos fueron encontrados durante el estudio botánico de 2011. Hay 25 individuos sembrados, 3 en el Centro de Visitantes El Portal y 22 en el Aviario de la Cotorra Puertorriqueña Iguaca. Su hábitat conocido con los tipos de bosques maduros y secundarios montanos de tabonuco. Véase la evaluación para la flora en riesgo, para una descripción detallada de esta especie.

 

Styrax portoricensis – Palo de jazmín: en peligro de extinción

Styrax portoricensis (Styracaceae) es un árbol siempreverde. Sus hábitats conocidos son los tipos de vegetación bosque secundario montano y bosque maduro muy húmedo nuboso montano de palo colorado. Hay 19 individuos reportados en El Yunque, sin embargo durante la última evaluación botánica, ninguna de las poblaciones fueron documentadas. Unos 50 individuos fueron sembrados por el Servicio de Pesca y Vida Silvestre alrededor del Aviario de la Cotorra Puertorriqueña Iguaca.

 

Ternstroemia luquillensis – Palo Colorado: en peligro de extinción

Ternstroemia luquillensis (Pentaphylacaceae) es una árbol siempreverde que ouede llegar a más de 60 pies  de altura. Su población está limitada a 6 individuos conocidos dentro de 4 poblaciones en el tipo de bosque maduro montano de tabonuco, bosque maduro montano de palo colorado y bosque maduro pluvial nuboso montano de Tabebuia/Eugenia, aunque puede que dos individuos hayan sido identificados erróneamente.

 

Ternstroemia subsessilis: en peligro de extinción

Ternstroemia subsessilis (Pentaphylecaceae) es un árbol/arbusto con hojas alternas que puede crecer más de 10 pies. Se encontraron aproximadamente 37 individuos distribuidos entre 4 poblaciones; sin embargo, durante el último estudio de 2011, estas poblaciones no fueron encontradas. Sus hábitats conocidos son los tipos de vegetación bosque maduro montano de palo colorado, bosque maduro montano de palma de sierra y bosque maduro pluvial nuboso montano de Tabebuia/Eugenia. Véase la sección de ecosistemas terrestres, para una descripción detallada de estos tipos de bosques.

 

Especies con Prioridad para Conservación

Orquídeas

De las 149 especies de orquídeas reportadas para Puerto Rico, 45 por ciento se reportan como nativas para las montañas de Luquillo (Kasomenakis, 1998). Siete (7) especies endémicas y una (1) especie nativa se consideran especies en riesgo y han sido propuestas para análisis adicional y determinar si se deben considerar como Especies con Prioridad para Conservación, para un total de 8 orquídeas de El Yunque. Son plantas pequeñas que varían en tamaño desde varios milímetros hasta 14 centímetros de alto. Son epífitas mayormente encontradas en peñones musgosos a lo largo de los riachuelos y en troncos y ramas de árboles cubiertos de musgo en el bosque muy húmedo montano y el bosque muy húmedo nuboso montano y musgo esfagnal en el suelo de los picos. Dos de estas orquídeas, Brachionidium ciliolatum y Lepanthes selenitepala, son endémicas de las montañas de Luquillo. Otras también se encuentran en la sierra de Cayey y la cordillera central (en los bosques estatales), pero generalmente, hay una falta de información sobre las localizaciones y los tamaños de las poblaciones. Las ubicaciones altitudinales varían desde 215 metros hasta 1300 metros a nivel del mar.

Estas orquídeas son mayormente amenazadas por el manejo de la vegetación que afecta el dosel forestal, mantenimiento de servidumbres de paso de carreteras y veredas, vientos huracanados, deslizamientos de tierra, bajos números poblacionales y algunas recolecciones no autorizadas.

El cambio climático que afecta la humedad disponible, en los lugares donde se encuentran los diferentes tipos de bosques, puede perjudicar las capas de musgo en diferentes partes del Bosque Nacional y directamente impactar la supervivencia, reproducción y tamaños de las poblaciones.

 

Taxanomía Taxanomía Especies

Nombre común

Planta Vascular  

Orquidea

Brachionidium ciliolatum B. Ciliolatum
Planta Vascular  

Orquidea

Brachionidium parvum B. Parvum
Planta Vascular  

Orquidea

Lepanthes caritensis Carite babyfoot orchid
Planta Vascular  

Orquidea

Lepanthes dodiana Dodiana babyfoot orchid
Planta Vascular  

Orquidea

Lepanthes selenitepala spp ackermanii Ackerman babyfoot orchid
Planta Vascular  

Orquidea

Lepanthes stimsonii Stimson babyfoot orchid
Planta Vascular  

Orquidea

Lepanthes veleziana Velez babyfoot orchid
Planta Vascular  

Orquidea

Lepanthes woodburyana Woodbury babyfoot orchid

 

Bejucos

Se proponen dos bejucos como Especies con Prioridad para Conservación. Gonocalix portoricensis es endémico a El Yunque y está restringido a los picos y Mikania pachyphyla es endémico a Puerto Ricio. Este último también se encuentra en la cordillera central y su población se estima en 2,946 individuos, pero su población en El Yunque no se ha determinado ni Mapeado. La población de G. portoricensis se estima en 8 individuos.

Estos bejucos son mayormente amenazados por el manejo de la vegetación que afecta el dosel forestal, mantenimiento de servidumbres de paso de carreteras y veredas, vientos huracanados, bajos números poblacionales y deslizamientos de tierra.

El cambio climático que afecta la humedad disponible, en los lugares donde se encuentran los diferentes tipos de bosques, puede perjudicar su existencia en El Yunque.

 

Taxanomía Taxanomía Especies

Nombre común

Planta Vascular  

Enredadera

Gonocalix portoricensis Gonocalyx (endemic)
Planta Vascular  

Enredadera

Mikania pachyphyla Mikania (endemic)

 

Arbustos

Se recomiendan once (11) especies de arbustos como Especies con Prioridad para Conservación en el Bosque Nacional, de los cuales cuatro (4) son endémicos a las montañas de Luquillo: Marlierea sintenisii, Miconea faveolata, Varronia wagnerorum y Solanum woodburyi). Hay siete (7) familias de plantas representadas en este grupo.

Se reporta o estima que todas estas especies tienen poblaciones pequeñas que hacen que las especies sean vulnerables a cualquier disturbio que pueda cambiar la estructura de la vegetación del bosque, su geomorfología y su morfología topográfica.

La amenaza principal inmediata para todas estas especies de El Yunque es la falta de información acerca de sus números poblacionales y localizaciones para monitorear los efectos del estrés como cambio climático, vientos huracanados, deslizamientos de tierra y cambios en la estructura del dosel. Los arbustos son parte del estrato vegetativo cobertor de la tierra y elementos claves de la red alimentaria.

Lso huracanes son un riesgo mayor particular y, considerando la carencia de información respecto al estado de sus poblaciones, analizar los efectos resulta difícil. El paso de los Huracanes Irma y María en septiembre 2017 es probable que hayan afectado estas poblaciones.

 

Taxanomía Taxanomía Especies

Nombre común

Planta Vascular   Arbusto

Brunfelsia lactea

Jazmin de monte  (endemic)
Planta Vascular   Arbusto

Brunfelsia portoricensis

Jazmin portoricensis (endemic)
Planta Vascular   Arbusto

Marlierea sintenisii

Beruquillo 
Planta Vascular   Arbusto

Miconia foveolata

Camasey
Planta Vascular  Arbusto

Solanum woodbury

Solanum (endemic)
Planta Vascular   Arbusto

Urera chorocalpa

Ortiga (endemic)
Planta Vascular   Arbusto

Varronia wagnerorum

Varronia (endemic)
Planta Vascular  

Arbusto/ Pequeño Arbol

Cybianthus sintenisii

Cybianthus (endemic)
Planta Vascular  

Arbusto/ Pequeño Arbol

Eugenia egersii Palo de murta (endemic)
Planta Vascular  

Arbusto/ Pequeño Arbol

Xylosma schwaneckeana Palo de Candela  (endemic)
Planta Vascular  

Pequeño Arbol

Miconia pycnoneura Camasey

 

Árboles

Hay quince (15) especies en este grupo que se recomiendan como Especies con Prioridad para Conservación: ocho (8) endémicos, cuatro (4) nativos y tres (3) endémicos al Bosque Nacional (Magnolia splendens, Calyptrantes luquillensis y Ternstroemia heptasepala). Ellos representan doce (12) familias de plantas. Todas las especies recomendadas (excepto M. splendens), se encuentran bajo el dosel dominante del bosque, es decir, son árboles pequeños (de 50 pies de alto, a lo máximo).

Se reporta o estima que todas estas especies tienen poblaciones pequeñas que hacen que las especies sean vulnerables a cualquier disturbio que pueda cambiar la estructura de la vegetación del bosque, su geomorfología y su morfología topográfica.

La amenaza principal inmediata para todas estas especies de El Yunque es la falta de información acerca de sus números poblacionales y localizaciones para monitorear los efectos del estrés o disturbios como cambio climático, vientos huracanados, deslizamientos de tierra y cambios en la estructura del dosel.

 

Taxanomía Taxanomía Especies

Nombre común

Planta Vascular  

Arbol

Ardisia luquillensis Mamayuelo  (endemic)
Planta Vascular  

Arbol

Banara portoricensis Caracolillo (endemic)
Planta Vascular  

Arbol

Calyptranthes luquillensis C. Luquillensis (endemic)
Planta Vascular  

Arbol

Calyptranthes woodburyi C. Woodburyi (endemic)
Planta Vascular  

Arbol

Coccoloba rugosa Ortegon
Planta Vascular  

Arbol

Conostegia hotteana Camasey peludo
Planta Vascular  

Arbol

Laplacea portoricensis Maricao verde
Planta Vascular  

Arbol

Magnolia splendens Laurel sabino (endemic)
Planta Vascular  

Arbol

Maytenus elongata Cuero de Sapo
Planta Vascular  

Arbol

Morella holdrigeana Palo de cera (endemic)
Planta Vascular  

Arbol

Psidium sintenisii Hoja menuda  (endemic)
Planta Vascular  

Arbol

Ravenia urbanii Tortugo prieto (endemic)
Planta Vascular  

Arbol

Symplocos lanata Nispero cimarron  (endemic)
Planta Vascular  

Arbol

Ternstroemia heptasepala Palo colorado (endemic)
Planta Vascular  

Arbol

Ternstroemia stahlii Palo de buey (endemic)

 

Magnolia splendens (laurel sabino (G3))

Esta especie es endémica a las montañas de Luquillo y las únicas poblaciones conocidas están en El Yunque. Es nativo a un área donde el crecimiento de los árboles es lento: 0.06 pulgadas de incremento en diámetro en un período de 5 años, para una muestra de 46 árboles. La mayor parte de las semillas son aparentemente estériles, lo que grandemente limita el futuro de este árbol. Se fomenta el crecimiento de los árboles jóvenes, dondequiera que aparezcan de manera natural. El alcance en elevación sobre el nivel del mar es de 400 a 850 metros, lo que significa que se espera que parte de la población esté dentro del bosque nuboso (humedal funcional). Durante la década de 1930, el uso de árboles maduros para hacer muebles y gabinetes para oficinas administrativas, por parte del Cuerpo Civil de Conservación, dramáticamente redujo la población madura existente de esta especie. (Little yWadsworth, 1964.)

El Departamento de Recursos Naturales y Ambientales de Puerto Rico clasifica la especie como “elemento crítico”, de acuerdo a su clasificación de protección. La especie debe monitorearse para determinar su alcance geográfico actual, tamaños poblacionales y localizaciones, y su fenología y reproducción.

 

Helechos y yerbas

Hay tres (3) especies en este grupo: una (1) (Pilea multicaulis) endémica a El Yunque y tres (3) endémicas a Puerto Rico. Se reportan que tres (3) especies tienen un alcance entre los 650 metros y los 1300 metros sobre el nivel del mar, es decir, el bosque nuboso (humedal funcional). Lindsaea stricta var. jamesoniiformis es el único helecho de este grupo.

Se reporta o estima que todas estas especies tienen poblaciones pequeñas que hacen que las especies sean vulnerables a cualquier disturbio que pueda cambiar la estructura de la vegetación del bosque, su geomorfología y su morfología topográfica.

La amenaza principal inmediata para todas estas especies de El Yunque es la falta de información acerca de sus números poblacionales y localizaciones para monitorear los efectos del estrés o disturbios como cambio climático, vientos huracanados, deslizamientos de tierra y cambios en la estructura del dosel y también el ciclo hídrico de los bosques nubosos y la elevación en la cual de forman las nubes.

 [AP-1]See edits. (At the end of this sentence, changed “and it is possible that is the populations were affected”, to “likely further affected these populations.”)

 

Taxanomía Taxanomía Especies

Nombre común

Planta Vascular  

Helecho

Lindsaea stricta var. jamesoniformis Lindsaea
Planta Vascular  

Hierba

Pilea multicaulis P. Multicaulis
Planta Vascular  

Hierba

Pilea yunquensis P. Yunquensis (endemic)




https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/elyunque/landmanagement/resourcemanagement/?cid=fseprd713406