Welcome to the Prescott National Forest!

Where the Desert Meets the Pines

The Prescott National Forest is guardian of 950 miles of scenic trails and more than 100,000 acres of wilderness. With a mild climate and proximity to Phoenix, you can visit year-round.

Discover Special Places

From picnicking, developed campsites and gentle trails to rock climbing, bouldering, dispersed camping and rafting on more than a million acres of incredible landscapes, there's something for everyone to see and do!

  • Recreation

    Canoeing on the Verde River

    Camping. Hiking. Climbing. Rafting. Fishing. Beauty. Nature.

    Fun! Adventure! Relaxation! Bliss!

  • Find Your Way

    Man pointing to point on map

    Maps for every need, the way you want them: Interactive, Printed, Downloadable

  • Passes/Permits

    view up through birch trees

    Purchase your passes and permits online or at your destination.

  • Caring for the Land

    Mexican Spotted Owls in a tree

    The Prescott National Forest manages public lands brimming with natural resources and diverse wildlife. We work to protect at-risk species, protect watersheds, ensure forest health through safe logging practices, and restore and maintain critical ecosystems.

  • History

    Drawing of historic Palace Station

    The Prescott Forest Reserve was established by the General Land Office on May 10, 1898. It was transferred to the U.S. Forest Service in 1906 and became a National Forest on March 4, 1907.  Just a year later, the Prescott expanded with the inclusion of the Verde National Forest  on July 1, 1908.  The final area was defined on October 22, 1934, when the Tusayan National Forest was merged.

Recent News


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Features

Aldo Leopold 1920 Report on the Prescott National Forest

Historic photo of Horsethief Lake taken in 1920

A historic report witten by Aldo Leopold in 1920 about the condition of the Prescott National Forest and its management.

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