Working Together

Managing a national forest as large and varied as the Ottawa National Forest requires the efforts of not only dedicated employees, but a great many partners and volunteers who contribute greatly to the successful management of forest resources. Our partners help maintain recreation sites and trails, reduce hazardous fuels, restore watersheds, monitor wildlife populations, improve wildlife and fisheries habitat, inventory and monitor archeological and historic sites, provide input to proposed management activities, conduct conservation education programs, and respond to emergency incidents. Our partners include a number of federal agencies, tribes, State of Michigan, conservation organizations, universities, public entities and private citizens. Their assistance is provided through a number of avenues including various grants, partnerships, and volunteer efforts.

 

For information about working with the Ottawa National Forest or about existing working relationships between the Ottawa National Forest and other agencies, select one of the sections below.

Contracting
Grants and Agreements
Parternships
Recreation Resource Advisory Committees
Tribal Relations
Volunteering

 

 

 

 

Contracting

The Ottawa National Forest is a substantial contributor to the economies of local communities through the contracting with various businesses and citizens for the procurement and acquisition of goods and services.

Services are provided through contracts, purchasing, and other various contract tools.

Contract services included:

  • Tree thinning projects
  • Construction of trails
  • Service contracts such as janitorial services
  • Contracting construction needed for repair and construction of facilities
  • And other various commodities and services.

 

Contractors working on a paving project.The Ottawa National Forest receives procurement support for acquisitions over $25,000 from the Lake States Acquisition Team. Acquisitions below $25,000 are processed by the Ottawa National Forest’s Purchasing Office.

In addition to the Ottawa, the Lake States Acquisition Team provides shared services for contracting and acquisition to the:

The following three sites provide information on contracting with the federal government:

  • The Federal Business Opportunities website, known as FedBizOpps, is where commercial vendors may search and retrieve opportunities solicited by the entire Federal contracting community, including the Forest Service.
  • National information for Forest Service Acquisition, including a helpful checklist for contractors, can be found at Forest Service Acquisitions
  • The USDA Forecast of Contracting Opportunities lists planned procurement opportunities for the current fiscal year.

Contact Information

Lake States Acquisition Team

USDA Forest Service
Lake States Acquisition Team
500 Hanson Lake Road
Rhinelander, WI 54501
Phone: 715-362-1187
Fax: 715-362-1188

Ottawa National Forest Purchasing Office

USDA Forest Service
Ottawa National Forest
ATTN: Stacy Maki
E6248 US2
Ironwood, MI 4938
Phone: 231-932-1330 ext. 343
Fax: 906-932-0122
Email: slmaki@fs.fed.us

 

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Grants and Agreements

Working cooperatively with state, local government, institution of higher learning, profit and non-profit organizations to diversify local economies, protect lives, homes and natural resources from uncontrolled wildland fires, and forest stewardship and servicing the public grants and agreements management in accordance with applicable laws and regulations.

For more information visit:

 

 

If you would like to enter into an agreement with the Ottawa National Forest contact an Office.

 

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Partnerships

Managing a national forest as large and varied as the Ottawa National Forest requires the efforts of dedicated partners who contribute greatly to the successful management of forest resources. Our partners help maintain recreation sites and trails, reduce hazardous fuels, restore watersheds, monitor wildlife populations, improve wildlife and fisheries habitat, inventory and monitor archeological and historic sites, provide input to proposed management activities, conduct conservation education programs, and respond to emergency incidents. Our partners include a number of federal agencies, tribes, State of Michigan, conservation organizations, universities, public entities and private citizens. Their assistance is provided through a number of avenues including various grants, partnerships, and volunteer efforts.

For more information on some of our partnerships view the spotlights at the bottom of the page.

 

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Recreation Resource Advisory Committee

The Ottawa National Forest has two Secure Rural Schools Resource Advisory Committee's (RAC's) that are chartered by the USDA: Gogebic and Ontonagon. Members of both the Gogebic and Ontonagon RAC's have been vetted and designated by the Secretary of the USDA, and both meet under Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA) regulations. Both committtees first met in 2010. All meetings are open to the public.

For more information visit the RAC's web page.

 

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Tribal Relations

The Federal government and Indian tribes have a unique relationship that is “government-to-government”. The basis for this is in the constitution of the United States (Article 1, Section 8) which recognized tribes as sovereign. The Forest Service is committed to this relationship with federally recognized Tribal governments.
National Forests have important historical, spiritual, and cultural significance for Tribes. Forests often serve as a source of traditional medicines, food, firewood, and basketry materials. Consultation with tribes provides an invaluable means of obtaining expert advice, ideas, information, and diverse opinions from Native Americans in an effort to work together collaboratively to achieve positive outcomes for ecosystem health and cultural values.

The Forest Service and 10 Chippewa Tribes of the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission entered into an agreement December 1998. The agreement deals primarily with the exercise of the Tribes' treaty rights to gather wild plants on National Forest lands within the areas ceded in those treaties. Information about the agreement can be found on below listed links:

To obtain more information on agreements, Memorandum Of Understandings, and additional links with local Tribes visit the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forests website

 

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Volunteering

Volunteers are an important part of caring for the land and serving the people on our National Forest.

Volunteering isn't just beneficial for the forest, it benefits you. Simply put, it's fun. It can give you the opportunity to pursue a special interest, such as bird watching or hiking. The types of work you may perform are many and varied. If you are interested in volunteering contact the nearest Forest Service office or email us at Ottawa_NF@fs.fed.us .

The Ottawa National Forest has several groups and organizations that we work with on a regular basis (pdf). These groups are often in need of new members and volunteers.

The Ottawa National Forest typically offers a volunteer event on National Public Lands Day, always the last Saturday in September.

 

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Features

Resource Advisory Committee

The Ottawa National Forest has two Secure Rural Schools Resource Advisory Committee's (RAC's) that are chartered by the USDA: Gogebic and Ontonagon.  Members of both the Gogebic and Ontonagon RAC's have been vetted and designated by the Secretary of the USDA, and both meet under Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA) regulations.  Both committtees first met in 2010.  All meetings are open to the public.

Spotlights

Bergland Cultural and Heritage Center and Museum

The former ranger station is now a museum with a large display of earlier days, preserving, documenting and displaying artifacts donated or loaned from the areas history.   




https://www.fs.usda.gov/main/ottawa/workingtogether