Prevention

Fire Prevention

Smokey and FriendsDid you know that almost half of fires reported on national forests and grasslands in the Rocky Mountain Region are human-caused fires? There are some simple things that you can do to help.

  • Know before you go on your trip! Check with the local forest and fire agencies to see if fire restrictions are in place.
  • Never leave a campfire unattended. Make sure you completely extinguish your campfire before you leave. Drown the fire with water and stir with your shovel. Feel for any heat using the back of your hand. Continue to drown and stir until it is completely out. If it’s too hot to touch – it’s too hot to leave.
  • Avoid parking on dry grass. The heat from your undercarriage of your vehicle can cause accidental ignition.
Smokey bear poster only you
Visit www.smokeybear.com for more fire prevention tips.
Smokey Says Episode 1:  Extinguishing a Campfire 

 

house on fire and a red circle with slash throuhg it
Check fire restrictions at Rocky Mountain Region National Forests & Grasslands.

Wildfire Mitigation - Reducing the negative impacts of wildfire

Did you know that only 10% of the land in our five state region (CO, KS, NE, SD and WY) are USDA Forest Service lands? Much of our lands are neighboring communities and private lands. It is important to us that we are good neighbors, especially when it comes to wildfire. Here are some ways we are working to reduce the negative impacts of wildfire and ways you can help around your home and community.

Fire Restrictions

Wildfires have both good and bad impacts to our public lands and communities that depend on them. We are working to lessen the impacts that wildfire has on people and communities. Prescribed fire is a way for maintaining the well-being of our forests and grasslands.

When a prescribed fire project is cone, it is performed under very specific conditions, which are identified in a detailed plan that is developed as a result of years of planning and using the best science available.

Increase your home’s survival and family’s safety during a wildfire by taking some simple actions around your home. Clean gutters, stack firewood away from the home and have a plan on what to do in case of a wildfire. Visit www.firewise.org for more great tips!

Take responsibility for wildfire risk and become Fire Adapted. To learn more visit www.fireadapted.org.

Ready – Be ready

Wildfire is coming. Are you ready?Sometimes to be safe, you will need to evacuate. Are you Ready, Set, Go prepared? It may save your life. ww.wildlandfireRSG.or 

Be FirewiseTake personal responsibility and prepare long before the threat of a wildland fire so your home is ready in case of a fire. Create defensible space by clearing brush away from your home. Use fire-resistant landscaping and harden your home with fire-safe construction measures. Assemble emergency supplies and belongings in a safe place. Plan escape routes and make sure all those residing within the home know the plan of action.

Set – Situational awareness 

Pack your emergency items. Stay aware of the latest news and information on the fire from local media, your local fire department and public safety. 

Go – Act early!

Follow your personal wildland fire action plan. Doing so will not only support your safety, but will allow firefighters to best maneuver resources to combat the fire.

We are ready, are you?

Helpful Links:

Fire Wise

National 
Weather 
Service

American 
Red
Cross

Front Range 
Fuels Treatment 
Partnership

Federal
Emergency 
Management

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Smokey Bear Homepage: GET YOUR SMOKEY ON! Sign the pledge to help stop wildfires!



https://www.fs.usda.gov/main/r2/fire-aviation/prevention