Projects

Schedule of Proposed Actions (SOPA)

The central Oregon Schedule of Proposed Actions (SOPA) is published quarterly and contains reports on Deschutes & Ochoco National Forests and Prineville District, Bureau of Land Management proposed activities and invites involvement as part of implementing the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).

Forest Service (SOPA):

Bureau of Land Management (BLM) SOPA:

Current & Recent Forest NEPA Projects

Projects are proposed actions that are analyzed through the NEPA process (EIS, EA, or CE) that involves analyzing different alternatives to the proposed action, requires public notice and comment, and results in a NEPA decision (ROD, DN, or DM) which, subject to an administrative appeals process, and is implemented on the ground. The Forest Projects below are projects that we are analyzing or have analyzed under the NEPA process. Projects that are "Developing Proposal" or "Under Analysis" may have an opportunity for public collaboration and input on the proposed actions and the analysis being conducted.

The links below allow you to sort projects by Name, Status, Management Unit or Purpose.

The subscription below will sign up for all project notifications on the Deschutes National Forest. For instruction on how to sign up for notifications for only a particular project, click here.

 

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Archived Forest Project Information

Here are the pages to find archived projects. Some, but not all, archived projects may appear in more than one location.

Features

Ryan Ranch

Photo from above Ryan Ranch wetland

Why is the US Forest Service planning restoration work at Ryan Ranch?

  • Erosion of the riverbank and artificial berm is compromising the Deschutes River Trail and contributing sediment into the river. The existing elevation of the berm and riverbank prevents the establishment of native riparian vegetation capable of resisting this erosion. Lowering the elevation of the riverbank would allow thickly rooted sedges to be re-established along the immediate floodplain of the river.