Welcome to Monongahela National ForestMonongahela National Forest, in the northcentral highlands of West Virginia, is a place where visitors can enjoy breathtaking vistas, peaceful country roads, gently flowing streams, and glimpses of the many plants and animals that live here. This special place was established in 1920 and encompasses one of the most ecologically diverse areas in the United States, with elevations from just under 1,000 feet to 4,863 feet above sea level. The Monongahela is a ‘working’ forest, which provides timber, water, grazing, minerals and recreational opportunities. Explore your Forest!

Enjoy your National Forest

Recent News


Features

Monongahela National Forest Makes Headway on Flood Recovery Projects in 2017

Before and after photos show a full restoration to a washed out portion of road.

In early 2017 the Federal Highway Administration approved $25 million through the Emergency Relief for Federally Owned Roads Program to repair flood-damaged roads, bridges, culverts, and trails in West Virginia’s Monongahela National Forest.


Joint Chiefs’ Landscape Restoration Partnership Initiative

Black cows meandering up a hillside.

The USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service and Forest Service are working together in West Virginia to improve the health of forests where public forests and grasslands connect to privately owned lands through the Joint Chiefs’ Landscape Restoration Partnership. Find out more about how these partners work together to restore landscapes, reduce wildfire threats to communities and landowners, protect water quality and enhance wildlife habitat.


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Spotlights

Wyatt Nature Trail Repair Near Marlinton

A wide bed of new gravel is laid along a trail under a green canopy.

Marlinton’s Wyatt Nature Trail was damaged during the June 2016 flood. See more about this summer's repairs to this community-oriented trail.

Atlantic Coast Pipeline Updates

The Atlantic Coast Pipeline, a natural gas pipeline, proposes to cross 5 miles of the Monongahela National Forest and 15 miles of the George Washington National Forest. 

 




Timber Contracting

A neatly stacked pile of freshly cut timber.

Interested in how we manage timber sales? Our timber contracting page has been recently updated with details on timber management and guides for business with the Forest Service.